Moody’s downgrades Papua New Guinea’s rating to B2 with stable outlook

Global Credit Research – 25 Apr 2016

Singapore, April 25, 2016 — Moody’s Investors Service has today downgraded the Government of Papua New Guinea’s (PNG) foreign currency and local currency issuer ratings to B2 from B1. The outlook on these ratings is stable. This concludes the review for downgrade initiated on 25 February 2016.

The key drivers of the downgrade are:

• Strains on foreign currency reserve adequacy due to heightened balance of payments pressures that will continue over the next two years; and

• The persistence of unfavorable domestic funding conditions for the government that have increased refinancing risks and eroded debt affordability.

The stable outlook is based on Moody’s view that PNG’s medium-term economic growth prospects remain robust, although lower commodity prices and the consequent fiscal and economic adjustment will weigh on growth outcomes in 2016 and 2017. In addition, a reduction in fiscal deficits has helped to slow the rise in government debt, which remains low among similarly-rated countries.

While the review was prompted in part by the impact of structurally weaker prices of oil and related commodities on PNG’s economy and fiscal accounts, we have determined that the continuation of the pressures on government and external liquidity first flagged when we assigned a negative outlook in 2015 were more relevant.

 

RATINGS RATIONALE

DOWNGRADE TO B2

First driver: Continued deterioration in foreign currency reserve adequacy

PNG’s gross foreign currency reserves have fallen sharply to $1.69 billion at end-2015, down from a peak of $4.26 billion at end-2011, reflecting the continuation of the balance of payments pressures that prompted our assignment of a negative outlook on PNG’s rating last year. Liquefied natural gas (LNG) production drove the large rise in exports and the restoration of the current account surplus since 2014. However, this has failed to stem the deterioration in PNG’s external payments position as cross-border debt servicing and other demands for foreign currency as represented by the large financial account outflows have overwhelmed the supply of hard currency available to the central bank, the Bank of Papua New Guinea (BankPNG).

BankPNG has intervened to stem a disorderly adjustment of the exchange rate, and placed the costs of this intervention at $828.5 million in 2015 alone. It also introduced exchange controls last year that effectively rationed foreign currency.

Although production at the country’s largest gold and copper mine resumed in March 2016, associated export receipts will only mitigate, not eliminate, the ongoing balance of payments pressures. Reserve adequacy has weakened accordingly, with our estimate of short-term external debt repayments rising to over 140% of the stock of foreign currency reserves as compared to 83.7% in 2014. Moreover, the challenging environment for external liquidity has fed back to the real economy through weaker sentiment, which is already suffering from the decline in global prices for PNG’s commodity exports.

Second driver: Pressures on the government’s liquidity position due to unfavorable funding conditions

Declining fiscal revenue and constrained domestic financing conditions have weakened the government’s liquidity position. Although commencement of LNG production supported economic activity in 2015, it has not benefited revenue to the same degree, because of lower LNG prices which track oil price trends with a lag of a few months. We estimate revenue as a share of GDP fell to 17.1% in 2015, the lowest level in at least a decade, and project a further decline in this ratio this year.

Wide deficits in recent years have led to higher interest rates for government securities, as domestic investors have lowered their exposure to sovereign risk by either shortening duration or limiting their holdings of government debt. Refinancing risks have thus risen as the proportion of domestic market debt comprised of short-term obligations has increased, and debt affordability has deteriorated rapidly on account of the higher interest rates demanded in primary auctions. Short-term debt now accounts for 48.1% of total domestic market debt as of end-2015, while interest payments as a share of revenue—our preferred measure of debt affordability—has nearly doubled to 9.8% in 2015 from 5.3% in 2013.

Central bank absorption has offset somewhat the decreased local appetite for government bonds—BankPNG held 21.0% of domestic market debt as of September 2015, up from 7.1% two years earlier. Nevertheless, poor funding conditions have led the government to curtail spending, further weighing on economic growth.

 

STABLE OUTLOOK

The stable outlook balances the weak near term growth outlook against more robust economic prospects over the longer-term. In particular, the successful implementation of the PNG LNG Project has demonstrated operational efficiencies, profitability, and a relatively low cost structure, which enhance PNG’s competitive advantage in extractive industries, and bolster the prospects of similarly large projects, even against the backdrop of structurally lower commodity prices. Such projects include a potential expansion of the preexisting PNG LNG Project, an entirely new development called the Papua LNG Project, and the Wafi-Golpu gold mine. While we do not expect material progress on the implementation of these projects until late 2017, the resulting upturn and stabilization in growth will, in our view, alleviate external and fiscal pressures from escalating. In the interim, however, Moody’s expects the government’s fiscal consolidation efforts to maintain low government debt levels compared to similarly rated peers, while funding conditions and external liquidity will remain tight. An upturn and stabilization in growth and exports will, in our view, keep external and fiscal pressures from escalating. In addition, Moody’s expects the government’s fiscal consolidation efforts to keep government debt levels low as compared to similarly rated peers.

 

WHAT COULD CHANGE THE RATING UP

Moody’s would consider upgrading the rating if increased non-debt creating external inflows lead to a material build-up in foreign currency reserves and improve reserve adequacy. A sustained improvement in the government’s fiscal and liquidity position accompanied by the restoration of the trend in debt consolidation would also be credit positive. Over the longer term, enhancements to potential growth and government revenue through the development of large projects, such as potentially significant additions to LNG and gold production, would also lead to upward pressure on the rating.

 

WHAT COULD CHANGE THE RATING DOWN

Triggers for a further negative rating action include: (1) a reemergence of wide fiscal deficits that lead to a rapid rise in government debt; (2) a worsening of growth prospects that could ultimately weigh on fiscal and debt sustainability; (3) a further decline in foreign currency reserves.

 

COUNTRY CEILINGS

Moody’s has lowered Papua New Guinea’s long-term foreign currency (FC) bond ceiling to B1 from Ba3 as well as its long-term FC deposit ceiling to B3 from B2. PNG’s short-term FC bond and deposit ceilings remain unchanged at “Not Prime.” These ceilings act as a cap on the ratings that can be assigned to the FC obligations of other entities domiciled in the country.

  • PNG’s local currency bond and deposit ceilings remain unchanged at Ba2.
  • GDP per capita (PPP basis, US$): 2,470 (2014 Actual) (also known as Per Capita Income)
  • Real GDP growth (% change): 9.9% (2015 Actual) (also known as GDP Growth)
  • Inflation Rate (CPI, % change Dec/Dec): 6.4% (2015 Actual)
  • Gen. Gov. Financial Balance/GDP: -3.9% (2015 Actual) (also known as Fiscal Balance)
  • Current Account Balance/GDP: 20.9% (2015 Estimate) (also known as External Balance)
  • External debt/GDP: 69.2% (2015 Estimate)
  • Level of economic development: Low level of economic resilience

Default history: No default events (on bonds or loans) have been recorded since 1983.

On 20 April 2016, a rating committee was called to discuss the rating of the Papua New Guinea, Government of. The main points raised during the discussion were: The issuer’s economic fundamentals, including its economic strength, have not materially changed. The issuer’s fiscal or financial strength, including its debt profile, has not materially changed. The issuer has become increasingly susceptible to event risks. An analysis of this issuer, relative to its peers, indicates that a repositioning of its rating would be appropriate. Government and external liquidity risk have increased. Other views raised included: The issuer’s institutional strength/ framework, have not materially changed.

The principal methodology used in these ratings was Sovereign Bond Ratings published in December 2015. Please see the Ratings Methodologies page on http://www.moodys.com for a copy of this methodology.

The weighting of all rating factors is described in the methodology used in this credit rating action, if applicable.

 

REGULATORY DISCLOSURES

For ratings issued on a program, series or category/class of debt, this announcement provides certain regulatory disclosures in relation to each rating of a subsequently issued bond or note of the same series or category/class of debt or pursuant to a program for which the ratings are derived exclusively from existing ratings in accordance with Moody’s rating practices. For ratings issued on a support provider, this announcement provides certain regulatory disclosures in relation to the credit rating action on the support provider and in relation to each particular credit rating action for securities that derive their credit ratings from the support provider’s credit rating. For provisional ratings, this announcement provides certain regulatory disclosures in relation to the provisional rating assigned, and in relation to a definitive rating that may be assigned subsequent to the final issuance of the debt, in each case where the transaction structure and terms have not changed prior to the assignment of the definitive rating in a manner that would have affected the rating. For further information please see the ratings tab on the issuer/entity page for the respective issuer on http://www.moodys.com.

For any affected securities or rated entities receiving direct credit support from the primary entity(ies) of this credit rating action, and whose ratings may change as a result of this credit rating action, the associated regulatory disclosures will be those of the guarantor entity. Exceptions to this approach exist for the following disclosures, if applicable to jurisdiction: Ancillary Services, Disclosure to rated entity, Disclosure from rated entity.

Regulatory disclosures contained in this press release apply to the credit rating and, if applicable, the related rating outlook or rating review.

Please see http://www.moodys.com for any updates on changes to the lead rating analyst and to the Moody’s legal entity that has issued the rating.

Please see the ratings tab on the issuer/entity page on http://www.moodys.com for additional regulatory disclosures for each credit rating.

 

Christian de Guzman
VP – Senior Credit Officer
Sovereign Risk Group
Moody’s Investors Service Singapore Pte. Ltd.
50 Raffles Place #23-06
Singapore Land Tower
Singapore 48623
Singapore
JOURNALISTS: (852) 3758 -1350
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Ela Beach gets timely Facelift

By: Jonny Andrews

I have been watching with interest the developments happening at Ela Beach.

It saddens me that most of the trees will be cut for this development but I am reminded that in order for something/someone to be remold they had to be broken into many many pieces.

Papua New Guinea is growing and with growth comes development. Development of infrastructure,  development of its tourism industry and development of its landscapes.

We continually compare ourselves to the Arab Nations but we must understand that, they reached that stage by starting off where we are right now. It was not an overnight miracle, it was a progressive development that changed their nation.

The Ela Beach Redevelopment it seems has 3 Contractors working on it.
1. Apec Haus and the Marina by OSL
2. Ela Beach Waterfront by CHEC
3. ?????  – this would be another company which will develop the area towards Koki

It is not only the Beachfront that is getting developed, the properties opposite the road would also see development. Currently, there is a plan to redevelop the IEA School, Ela beach hotel and properties inline with the whole development of Ela Beach.

This development of Ela Beach will join the Paga Hill Development and make it one of the biggest Development in the Pacific Region compared to other Pacific Island Nations.

Papua New Guinea is moving forward, it is time we also move our mindset and look forward to greater participation in our own land.

 


Port Moresby’s iconic beach to be modernized at a cost of K55 million. New developments to include APEC and a 4-lane highway
THE Hiri Moale Festival will be allocated space in the current redevelopment of the iconic Ela Beach in Port Moresby.

ela-main
Redevelopment of IEA in Ela Beach

This was made known by Member for Moresby South Justin Tkatchenko when he responded to questions on the redevelopment of the beach.

He added that the Motu-Koita Assembly, the voice piece of the Motu-Koitabu landowners of traditional Port Moresby, was in agreement of the redevelopment of the beach front which would bring in new jobs.

The annual three-day event, which culminates in the crowning of Miss Hiri Hanenamo, promotes the culture of the Motu coastal villagers

Mr Tkatchenko was also asked on the controversial issue of the land title which he fought to have extinguished after it was awarded to Awak Holdings Limited two years ago.

“I did not agree with the way the title was handed to Awak Holdings via the Lands Department.” Awaks development plan had also entailed reclamation of the shorefront about 50 metres but it met with opposition from Mr Tkatchenko and traditional landowners.

09ak_trees_0
Ela Beach Redevelopment by China Harbour Construction

“The beach front comes under National Capital District Commission and it is State land, open space and recreational.”

He added that after the extinguishing of the land title, the title was publicly tendered by NCDC and awarded to Cardno and China Harbour Engineering Company for the roadworks.

The Ela Beach Foreshore Development Plan was unveiled in September last year.

In that plan the beach front will undergo two stages of development with stage one will see completion of APEC Haus to be constructed on NCDC’s sea park land. APEC Haus will be the venue for the Asia-Pacific Economic Co-operation Leaders’ Summit next year.

The second major development would be the construction of Ela Beach Road as a four-lane road to align with Healy Parade and Paga Point Ring Road; construction of about 300 car parks; and redevelopment of Ela Beach as per the unveiled master plan.

NCDC had dedicated its land being the former sea park jetty for the construction of APEC Haus. Post Courier /ONE P

 

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$17 million road improvement, beach extension project in Port Moresby

By Benorah Hesehing

PORT MORESBY, Papua New Guinea (The National, Feb. 10, 2017)

Work will begin today to give Port Moresby’s iconic Ela Beach a K55 million [US$17 million] facelift.

 

NCD Governor Powes Parkop said the redevelopment project involved the construction of a two-lane road and an extension of the beach by another 100 metres.

“The work will begin tomorrow (today) and I am calling on the public for their understanding and cooperation,” Parkop told a media conference yesterday.

“There will be some disruptions for the earth work but we intend to keep the existing roads operational while the new lanes are being constructed.

Ela beach Road Map
Road Map for Ela Beach Redevelopment

“Some of the trees, shrubs and palms which provide shade would be removed to create way for construction.”

He added that the National Capital District Commission was doing all it could to retain the old trees. “We understood that the older trees were part of the Ela beach heritage and are working hard to save those, which can be saved,” Parkop said.

He said the people should not think about what they would lose, but what they would gain from the redevelopment project.

Ela-Beach-Marina-Development
Ela Beach Marina Hotel

Moresby South MP and Minister for Sports and National Events Justin Tkatchenko said the project was a “fantastic achievement for NCDC”.

“We can plant advanced trees within the landscaping for Ela Beach to ensure what is replaced is suitable or even better,” he said

Ela-Beach-Marina-Development-1
Ela Beach Marina with APEC Haus in the Middle

 

Changing the AID game in PNG

By: The Garamut 

In what has been billed as a shock announcement carried by major news outlets across the Torres Strait, it’s been reported that PNG has formally asked Australia to consider and review how it distributes its annual $AU550 million aid package.
The request was put during the 25th PNG-Australia Ministerial Forum recently held in Madang with senior PNG ministers highlighting the government’s wish to see Australian aid managed directly through the PNG budget by 2020.
Citing internal policy documents including PNG’s Medium Term Development Plan, National Strategy for Responsible Sustainability Development Plan and the 2015 Development Cooperation Policy – which all signal changes in how the government wants to manage foreign development assistance – Minister for National Planning Charles Abel said:

“We want trade not aid. We just want them to come in and support the PNG Government system. They are channeling their aid, which is recognised in our budget, but it’s not really passing through our budget.

“We want you to continue the work, you helping us, but you have to make it more strategic and more visible and thicker, not thinly spread everywhere. All we are saying is we have established our government plans, we have our targets and we want you to come in and work through our plans.”

This message is not new.
It is one that has been consistently presented to previous PNG-Australia Ministerial Forums and PM Peter O’Neil himself highlighted the issue when he addressed the National Press Club in 2012 – that is, PNG wants the way Australian aid is disbursed to be “re-aligned” with government processes and priorities.
The main concern here lies with the creation of a “parallel system” outside the scope of national budgetary, administrative, management and – importantly – maintenance processes whereby duplication of programs targeting similar outcomes exist.
This wastage of resources is compounded when some foreign development programs are discontinued leaving a delivered outcome, whether asset or service, in administrative limbo. It does not help when provincial governments are tasked with ownership of these outcomes on existing stretched budgets.
It is not unrealistic for the government to seek to funnel development cooperation resources toward helping achieve PNG’s development goals as enshrined in the constitution and supported by government policies.
This makes sense, however, presenting such a request can only be taken seriously if adequate and transparent due diligence on the utilization and application of development cooperation resources by the PNG government can be guaranteed.
A level of respect and trust in the bilateral relationship is needed here – and whether it currently exists to the depth required for the request to be granted is questionable.
Ironically, the very substance of PNG’s request that Australia respect PNG’s sovereignty in trying to direct where development assistance should be invested – a premise alluded to time and time again in the 2015 Development Cooperation Policy – flies in the face of a sovereign state’s fundamental responsibility to ensure that its most basic needs are fully met out of its own pocket and not subsidized by the goodwill of others.
And herein lies the challenge for PNG – for no matter how this government frames it, the move to ask Australia to direct fund the national budget by 2020 will be perceived by many as a money grab by a floundering state.
Indeed, news headlines in Australia have already pointed the conversation toward this context; and it follows hot on the heels of other stories reporting PNG’s struggle to meet its financial obligations.
Despite this, with each consecutive budget, total foreign aid decreases as a percentage of PNG’s annual budget. In addition, the OECD Development Cooperative Directorate estimates that Australian development assistance to PNG has undergone a 29 percent real-decline since 2009.
But, as a component of total aid received by PNG, Australian development assistance makes up 68% of all donor contributions. It is because of its proportion that PNG is interested in setting a precedent of how it wants all aid to be “re-aligned”.
With the chances of the current government being re-elected for another five year term in 2017’s National Election remaining high, the push for Australia to fall into line with PNG’s request will not be sidelined – it will only gather momentum.
https://garamut.wordpress.com/2017/03/11/changing-the-aid-game-in-png/

Australia’s ‘Boomerang’ Aid should be directed into PNG National Budget

By: Bernard Keane 



Who profits from our foreign aid?: the ‘technical assistance’ making business rich

Australia’s “boomerang aid” has been making corporate Australia very rich for years.

“Boomerang aid” is the name Michael Somare claims he invented to describe the propensity of Australian aid to PNG to end up back in Australia, courtesy of highly-paid Australian consultants and firms specialising in “technical assistance” in the delivery of aid projects. For a small number of firms, it has provided a taxpayer-funded path to massive success.

“Technical assistance” is a billion-dollar business funded by Australian taxpayers. This year, we will spend $4.3b on foreign aid. Under the Government’s commitment to increase foreign aid to 0.5% of Gross National Income, that is scheduled to rise to $8-9b in five years’ time.
Technical assistance over the last decade has accounted for 40-50% of the entire aid budget.
A small number of Australian firms have done very well from this:

* Coffey International, the Chatswood, Sydney-based “global professional services consultancy”, garnered over $300 million in contracts in calendar year 2009 alone, Ausaid records show;

* Cardno ACIL secured at least $270 million, as did GRM, “a leading international development management company”;

* Queensland companies GHD and JTA International, both reaped over $100 million.
Boomerang aid has long been a basis for criticism of AusAID and our entire foreign aid program, particularly in relation to PNG, our largest aid recipient. In 2003, Michael Somare suggested over 60% of Australian aid simply went to Australians or Australian companies.
That year, the Senate Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade References Committee considered the issue as part of its report on Australia’s relationship with PNG and the Pacific, saying that the “most common concern raised with the Committee in relation to the delivery of aid was for the tendency for AusAID to use consultants, typically from Australia which lead to the perception of ‘boomerang aid’.” 
A number of submissions to the committee raised the issue, including those from the Business Council of PNG and from Oxfam Community Aid Abroad.
In response, AusAID rejected any criticism, declaring the “Australian aid program ensures that PNG citizens benefit from commercial opportunities, skills formation and capacity building.”
Papua New Guinea through its planning Minister Charles Abel recognized this gap in the Australian Aid and has proposed to negotiate the new AID Agreement.

“We would like to see a larger proportion of the budget actually going into hard, tangible, on-the-ground outcomes,” he said.

“Budgetary support will assist in programs and activities that the Government is trying to achieve and that alone will achieve a lot more positive outcomes than what’s going on at the moment,” 

Aid to be effective needs to be channeled into PNG’s national budget as opposed to being distributed by Australian Technical Assistance Team.

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Papua New Guinea asks Australia to fund health, education during ministerial forum

BY PAPUA NEW GUINEA CORRESPONDENT ERIC TLOZEK –THU MAR 09 11:19:03 EST 2017
Australia’s increasingly tricky relationship with Papua New Guinea could be about to get more difficult.


PNG’s Government has asked Australia to directly fund its health and education spending after it suffered a severe economic downturn and was forced to make major budget cuts.

PNG used the 25th ministerial forum between the two countries to ask Australia to shift its $500 million of annual aid away from narrowly-focused programs and into helping fund its health, education and infrastructure priorities.

Planning Minister Charles Abel said the shift was something that had been discussed for some time.

“The Papua New Guinea Government has sent a signal at this meeting of our desire to move by 2020 into a budget support arrangement where the program is channelled more directly through the PNG budget process,” he said.

Australia is the dominant contributor of aid to PNG, providing 68 per cent off its development assistance.

Mr Abel said that money could be having a bigger impact.

“We would like to see a larger proportion of the budget actually going into hard, tangible, on-the-ground outcomes,” he said.

PNG’s Major Events Minister Justin Tkatchenko said the request arose out of concerns about the effectiveness of Australia’s aid program and the amount of money that is spent on contractors and technical assistance.
“Budgetary support will assist in programs and activities that the Government is trying to achieve and that alone will achieve a lot more positive outcomes than what’s going on at the moment,” he said.

The request came as a surprise to the Australian ministerial delegation.

It also came after PNG suffered a major drop in revenue that forced its Government to slash spending, particularly to health services, but Mr Abel rejected suggestions it was linked to PNG’s cash shortage.

“It’s a policy-based directive that has come from a series of documents … it’s not a knee-jerk reaction,” he said.

Request catches Australian ministerial delegation off guard
Australia’s aid partnership with PNG is due to be renewed this year, so the Government was already evaluating the program.

But Foreign Minister Julie Bishop said Australia did not know PNG would make the request.

“That’s apparently a matter that’s been discussed within the PNG Government, it’s been raised with us today and we’ll consider it,” she said.

The change harks back to the way Australia used to deliver aid in PNG, by funding its budget directly.

But Australia stopped doing that in the early 1990s because of concerns about corruption and mismanagement.

Those concerns have not gone away.

Ms Bishop said any change to the aid program would need to meet Australia’s accountability standards.

We want to ensure that it’s transparent, that it’s value for money and it provides the kind of outcomes that will see economic development and prosperity here in PNG,” she said.

“And of course we must be answerable to the Australian taxpayer.”

The Government fears those taxpayers are becoming increasingly sceptical about the benefits of foreign aid.

Questions over how aid spending is getting to people who need it
The timing of the request, as PNG tries to weather a severe economic downturn, makes it even harder to sell.

Australia has given $5 billion in aid over the last decade, but has been changing its approach for the past few years.

The Australian Government, which has consolidated delivery of its programs into a Papua New Guinea Governance Facility, will be investing more in infrastructure and is seeking more partnerships with agencies like the World Bank and Asian Development Bank to deliver soft loans.

Such changes reflect a broader shift in aid spending, but also an attempt to make a bigger impact and force the PNG Government to comply with the strict standards for governance and program delivery required by multilateral agencies.

Australia also agreed to focus more on private-sector growth and trade, which would help protect and increase the $6.8 billion PNG-Australia trade relationship in the face of threats from China.

But the non-government organisations working in the aid sector have criticised that approach, saying PNG is a clear example of a place where economic growth has not delivered much benefit for disadvantaged people.

Despite 15 years of continuous growth, PNG still has one of the lowest levels of GDP per capita in the region.


Manus issues causing tension
It might not say so publicly, but the PNG Government has also been recently displaying frustration with Australia in other ways.

There has been tension over the Manus Island detention centre, particularly over the need to close it to comply with a PNG Supreme Court ruling.

People within the PNG Government say they are frustrated about the impact of the centre on PNG’s reputation, the political risk to the current Government, and the social issues that the day release of detainees has created on Manus Island.

That frustration has been accentuated by a delay in Australia delivering a promised $200 million redevelopment of the Angau hospital in Lae, which was agreed upon as part of the Manus Island deal.

Detainees at Manus Asylum Seekers Detention Center

Australia argues the delay is due to the PNG Government withdrawing its promised contribution, but PNG said it told Australia two years ago to just “get it done”.

Recent allegations that the medical company that runs the clinic at the Manus Island detention centre failed to obtain proper registration and breached a raft of other PNG laws — something strongly rejected by the company — could be seen as PNG putting further pressure on Australia to hasten the centre’s closure.

There has been no shortage of people noting the detrimental effect of the Manus Island deal on Australia’s ability to negotiate with PNG, but with the urgency increasing to close the centre by October, PNG could be looking to squeeze even more benefit out of its relationship with Australia at this time.

That has left Australia with a problem for both its aid program and its diplomatic relationship with the most populous and arguably most influential country in the western Pacific.

The complex business of PNG LNG market

By: Andrew A Arthur

After 200 shipments of LNG from Papua New Guinea and still we have not seen an profit nor have we seen any developments in Papua New Guinea!

This just one of the many comments by frustrated landowners and citizens in Papua New Guinea about the commercial viability of the PNG LNG.

Recent protests by landowners of Portion 152 for unpaid royalties also aired the same sentiments.

But why is there a delay on any inflows into the Government coffers and into the Government operating accounts to fund the national budget??

There are many answers to that but the root cause is how the agreement was structured and who gets what percentage and how did they fund their share percentages.

See below the share structure of the PNG LNG agreement;

  • Exxon Mobil (US) 33.201%
  • Oil Search (Aus) 29.003%
  • Santos (Aus) 13.532%
  • Nippon Oil Exploration (Japan) 4.680%
  • PNG Govt (NPC + Petromin) 16.779%
  • Landowner 2.805% 

Inorder to take up shares in the PNG LNG, you need to fund your percentage in those shares. PNG Government had to take an IPIC loan of over $1billion to fund its shares. All other parties would have done the same and taken out loans.

When the gas are sold, the parties start repaying their debt, these would equate to at least 3-7 years of loan repayments until they start to earn a profit from the sale of the gas.

It is estimated that by 2017, Papua New Guinea Government would be turning some profit in the 2nd quarter of the year when major loan repayments are done.

Papua New Guinea is on track to seeing huge profits from the sale of its LNG….

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Japan is major LNG buyer
By: Post Courier -1st March 2017
JAPAN is the largest buyer of liquefied natural gas in the region and is ready to share its experience of LNG and expand into the Asia-Pacific LNG market.
Yuki Sadamitsu from the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, said Japan remains the largest buyer of LNG in the rapidly growing LNG market in Asia.
Mr Sadamitsu made these remarks in his keynote address yesterday at the Petroleum and Energy Summit at the Stanley Hotel in Port Moresby.


“Japan remains to be a large buyer of LNG for the foreseeable future.
“LNG demands will be larger than the government estimate.
“Japan is ready to collaborate with global, especially Asia-Pacific partners to develop and expand the LNG market.
“This of course, includes cooperation between the energy producing and the consuming countries,” he said.
Japan is a consumer of mixed energy sources such as fossil fuel, oil, coal, LNG and others and is looking at reforming its energy market.
“Japanese LNG market is under drastic reform of liberalisation,” Mr Sadamitsu added.

As part of Japan’s strategy for LNG market development, they are looking at three pillars which are tradability, infrastructure, and price discovery including market expansion to move forward.
“If you look globally, Asia is the most rapidly growing LNG market.
“Asia LNG import will almost double by 2030.
“We, the Japanese government and companies are ready to cooperate with Asian countries to share know-how of LNG and expand the Asia-Pacific LNG market.
“We will work on the LNG strategy for Asian countries this year,” Mr Sadamitsu said.

Advance Australia unfair

By Emma Larking on February 10, 2017



Operation Sovereign Borders poster (Wikimedia Commons)Australia is pouring money into a system that targets the vulnerable in our region, and it is doing so with considerable secrecy and scant regard for the costs.
Recent evidence of its profligacy came in a report from the Australian National Audit Office claiming the immigration department spent $2.2 billion on offshore detention programs without going through adequate processes to ensure value for money, and without appropriate oversight of contracts for services.


The report found contracts had been entered into in haste to give effect to government policy decisions, and the result was higher than necessary expense for taxpayers and significant reputational risks for the Australian Government and the department.
Australia’s offshore detention camps are now notorious, but less is known about other attempts to curb irregular migration. Yet Australia invests heavily throughout the Asia-Pacific to ensure that irregular migrants – including asylum seekers – never arrive on its shores.
The Australian public has a right to know how the Government is spending public monies, to what ends and with what results. The public also deserves an explanation of how spending on border controls fits with other regional policy initiatives. These include justice programs designed to promote the rule of law, strengthen judicial independence, support national human rights institutions and counter violence against women and children.
In countries throughout the Asia-Pacific region, Australia provides funding and infrastructure to establish border controls, and personnel to draft new migration laws and policy frameworks. Members of the Australian Federal Police, defence force personnel and immigration department employees collaborate closely with their regional counterparts, often working in-country. The Australian Navy and Secret Intelligence Service are engaged in operations to intercept asylum seekers and stop people smuggling.
As well as the detention centres in Nauru and Papua New Guinea (PNG), Australia also funds detention centres in Indonesia. It funded the Nauruan and PNG Government’s defence in cases challenging the constitutionality of the detention centres. It also funds international agencies to process and oversee irregular migrants and refugees living in the community in Indonesia, Nauru, PNG, and until recently, Cambodia. Frequently, aid funding is linked to agreements to enhance border controls, repatriate nationals who have fled the country, or establish detention centres or refugee resettlement programs.
It is impossible to obtain clear financial costings, but a conservative accounting suggests Australia has spent well over a billion dollars annually since 2012 on these efforts to prevent irregular migration. With no boats known to have made landfall on Australian territory since late 2013, this might be considered money well spent – albeit a large pot of it. But what are the other costs associated with this secretive regime? There is the suffering of individuals trapped in countries where they are persecuted or live in limbo without rights. But there are also broader implications for Australia and the region.
In its collaborations with Cambodia, Iran, Nauru, PNG, Sri Lanka and Vietnam, Australia has aligned itself with authoritarian regimes implicated in serious human rights abuses. 

The funding it provides in exchange for support on irregular migration strengthens and entrenches these regimes. Australia is promoting the securitisation of irregular migration in the Asia-Pacific, putting it on what Josiah Heyman calls ‘a war footing’. In the process, the power of executive governments is enhanced, along with their immunity from public scrutiny and control. Throughout the region, rights activists have expressed dismay over these developments.
Australia’s refusal to open its borders to displaced people is also viewed with disdain by communities that are poorer and less well equipped to assist. Deni ToKunai, a political commentator in PNG, says the 2013 agreement to establish an Australian-funded detention centre contributed to “a boiling resentment [among many in PNG] against Australia and the Australian people never before seen by this generation”.
This resentment is unlikely to evaporate. PNG’s Supreme Court may have ruled the detention arrangements unconstitutional, but there are still hundreds of people living in the centre, and building work is underway on a new ‘transfer’ centre funded by Australia.
How Australia’s irregular migration policies interact with other forms of regional policy engagement has not been publicly explained or defended, but the former are inconsistent with other goals, including advancing the rule of law. Regional justice programs are unlikely to gain traction while Australia continues to fund detention and control regimes that perpetuate violence and operate outside the purview of the law. Instead, they may well contribute to regional perceptions of Australia as a nation of selfish and self-serving hypocrites.

http://devpolicy.org/advance-australia-unfair-20170210/?utm_source=Devpolicy&utm_campaign=07c434825b-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_082b498f84-07c434825b-312063401

HE WHO PLANTS FIRST, REAPS EARLY!

By: Andrew Arthur

The Agriculture Sector is about to get a Major Shakeup!

As the campaigning of forming the next Government heats up. Each Political party would want to be seen as the Government for the people and wants to connect to the people. Major policy pushed would be a returned to the Agriculture Sector …

First to fire their Policy is Pangu Party with a funding of K2billion promised for Agriculture! K1 billion to be spent on Coffee and Cocoa as they believe would earn more. The other K1 billion is to be spread across other agriculture sectors.

The reality is…according to FAO, coffee is listed number 22 of the most important and high earning crop and cocoa is not listed in the top 52 at all!

hydroponics-solves-food-security-issue
Hydroponic solves food security issues

Pangu would be guilty of making the same mistake they did in the early 1980’s………..

What this country needs is to invest into the right product…..look at the list attached, pick the Top 30 and invest into that according to priority.

Food Security is what is Needed the Most! Invest into Food Security as oppose to investing into Coffee and Cocoa!

1. Rice
2. Cattle Farming
3. Poultry Farming
4. Piggery
5. Tomatoes, beans, onions etc…

This is where the people in Papua New Guinea want us to invest in….this is what put food on the table

Invest in Food Security!

——————————————————–
Pangu Pati will invest into AGRICULTURE when in Government.

Today PNG’s Economy depends on 80% Non-renewal resources & 20% Agriculture export earnings, it was the other way around when we took independence in 1975.

Pangu Pati plans to invest at least K2b into agriculture with a billion directory into Coffee & Cocoa expansion and extension programs.

Coffee to become MINISTRY of COFFEE while cocoa to be the same as both are currently earning K500m into our economy from export earnings.

The investment into the two leading cash crops will see a 15 to 20 years timeline to increase production to earn over K2b plus into our economy.

Expansion and extension programs will see an annual investment K200m each into coffee and cocoa programs.

Agricuiture Ministry will be the leading ministry once again under Pangu Pati with coffee and cocoa to independently branch out into ministries of their own.

The rural population and business groups will participate more into agricuiture to feed PNG the world.
Agricuiture is sustainable and safe investment that PNG must quickly invest into to reduce our reliance on non-renewals.
The National Pg 7 07/02/17

most-valuable-crop-livestock
Most valuable crops and livestock according to FAO
16473502_10155141976821614_9182958399000375870_n
Pangu wants to invest in Coffee and Cocoa with K1 billion

ADB Helps PNG Expand Port Moresby International Airport Using PPP

By: The FINANCIAL

The Asian Development Bank (ADB) and the Papua New Guinea (PNG) National Airports Corporation (NAC) signed a transaction advisory services agreement to develop a new international passenger terminal at Port Moresby (Jacksons) International Airport through public-private partnership (PPP) on 2 February 2017.
“ADB has been a key development partner to NAC for several years through the landmark Civil Aviation Development Investment Program,” said Marcelo Minc, Country Director of ADB’s PNG Resident Mission. “Through this transaction advisory support to NAC for the Jacksons airport, we hope to complement the work we are doing across the PNG aviation sector, develop a regional hub for air traffic in the Pacific, and create a template for delivery of PPP projects in the region.”

The project will use a PPP scheme where the private sector will design, build, finance, operate, and maintain the airport facilities. A new international passenger terminal, the extension of the main runway, and other infrastructure enhancements will help the airport meet forecast air services growth up to 2040. The concession period and other parameters will be determined based on the feasibility study, according to ADB.
ADB’s support is part of its ongoing assistance to PNG to identify and develop PPPs in the transport sector, a key priority in ADB’s 2016-2020 Country Partnership Strategy for PNG. ADB has been supporting the government to improve 21 national airports to provide safer, more secure, and all-weather air transport services through the Civil Aviation Development Investment Program. Jacksons International Airport is part of the program.

The project will be ADB’s first PPP transaction advisory engagement in PNG and the Pacific. As part of the agreement, ADB also aims to create document and contact templates that may be used for future PPPs in the region and to build local expertise in PPP management and execution.
http://www.finchannel.com/business/63208-adb-helps-png-expand-port-moresby-international-airport-using-ppp

The 6 largest building projects set to change Port Moresby

This year’s business forecasts in PNG are looking more modest than previous years, but there’s no doubting better things are on the horizon for Port Moresby in 2017. The city’s skyline is set to change over the next eighteen months with the addition of new commercial, residential, hotel and retail buildings planned across the region.

With a range of projects in various stages of development, it’s a race against time to complete them before the APEC 2018 Summit. Even with project management, design and investment expertise from around the globe, the clock is ticking on the completion of Port Moresby’s newest buildings. Here’s Peopleconnexion Recruitment’s visual guide to the city’s latest projects.

1. Star Mountain Plaza

It seems fitting to start with talking about Star Mountain Plaza. Set to provide hotel, office and residential spaces ahead of the APEC 2018 Summit, Star Mountain Plaza is PNG’s first integrated commercial development. The K1.5b project is due for completion in August next year, under the project management of Stratum. Check out the first 30 seconds of this video to get a sense of just how huge this project is.

 

Architect’s aerial view mockup (source)

Attached Hilton development (source)

2. OPH Tower – Stage Two

Stage Two of the redevelopment of Old Parliament House in the city’s centre is officially underway. This stage will feature twin residential towers and penthouse apartments leased to corporate clients, paired with retail space. Official construction works began early last year and are set to be completed in late 2018.

OPH Commercial Tower (source)

OPH Two render (source)

OPH Two render (source)

3. Rangeview Heights

The commercial and residential estates in to be located in Waigiani’s City Centre are currently being developed by Lamana under their subsidiary Rangeview Heights Limited, of which Managing Director Sir Kostas Constantinou holds a directorship. The development includes residential townhouses, an attached shopping mall within the community, secure parking, a park and green areas for residents’ use.

Rangeview Heights mall (source)

Aerial view (source)

4. Paga Hill Estate

Paga Hill is set to be the city’s first multi-use development including luxury hotels, over 800 residential apartments, commercial and retail spaces, a marina and cultural centre. The project has been in proposal, planning and design development stages for years, but is finally ready to begin enter its investment and implementation stages after receiving the green light from the Government earlier this year. Estimates currently put the construction of attached Paga Hill City at around K3 billion.

Aerial view (source)

Artist’s rendering (source)

5. APEC Haus

The next iconic PNG landmark is expected to start construction early this year. To complete this K120 million project, Ela Beach will be extended out by 100 metres to support the structure, which will be built over the water. From the air, the building’s shape will resemble a traditional Moutan lakatoi sail.

“When you see it from the air, or when you see it from the land or when you see it from a post card or on TV, or on the internet or Facebook, you will symbolise and recognise it as Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea,” – Justin Tkatchenko, Minister for Sports and APEC

The construction of the building will be part of a larger Ela Beach redevelopment project involving a four lane highway to join the Paga Ring Road.

Artist’s render (source)

 

6. Loloata Island

Loloata Island Resort is still very much a work in progress. After being sold late last year, the former dive resort is set to be redeveloped into a luxury hotel with suites and private villas. Though technically not located in Port Moresby, this project’s massive undertaking makes it a development worth mentioning.

Aerial view (source)

Depictions by architects ThomsonAdsett:

Pacific Connectivity a Priority

By: 

If you’re old enough to remember business communications via telex, then you’ll understand just how important connectivity is to modern trade and the resulting economic development which in turn brings about significant improvements in health care, education and raises the general standard of living.vsat

It was the 1980s in PNG and I remember the arrival of our shiny new fax machine. It revolutionized the way we communicated. We could draw pictures to illustrate problems and instantly send these to the head office in Australia or the USA. We could place orders for supplies without standing in front of the telex, slowly typing messages that came out on delicate paper punch tape before being run through the machine again and hopefully not breaking mid stream. The fax machine improved our productivity and resulted in measurable improvements in our bottom line.

Fast forward almost 30 years, could you imagine running your business today without email, prevented from marketing your products on social media or not being able to look up manuals and parts catalogs. How could make it through lunch without knowing who was trying to contact you or who had written a review about your latest and greatest product or service, booking your return taxi ride to the office and all from the palm of your hand on your 3G or 4G smart phone. If all of a sudden you couldn’t do these things, your business would grind to a halt wouldn’t it? Well this is the every day experience that many hundreds of thousands of people throughout the Pacific face each and every day and in 2015 no less.

In Port Moresby, Honiara, Port Vila, Suva, Funafuti, Tarawa, Pago Pago and many more Pacific Island cities there’s a mobile communications revolution underway. If you’ve traveled through the islands recently you’ll agree that there’s an undeniable communications revolution underway. Some of the luckiest cities have undersea fiber cables, some have new ultra fast MEO satcom links. However you don’t have to venture too far from town to discover old G.703 E1 microwave links, connecting 2G phone sites. 2G banking and other text based apps are incredibly popular. These old networks will, or are already being crushed by the demand for data throughout the Pacific and not just in the most populace towns and cities but regional areas too. Data and communications demands will increase at an exponential rate in the coming years.

It’s a little old, November 2012 in fact, but I encourage you to take a look at the Lowy Institute for International Policy’s report titled; “Digital Islands: How the Pacific’s ICT Revolution is Transforming the Region”. It can be found here; http://www.lowyinstitute.org/files/cave_digital_islands_web.pdf. I find it an extremely interesting read. Just one of the many profound quotes; “What makes the ICT revolution in the Pacific particularly transformative is its potential to address the region’s demographic, geographic and economic challenges”. 

I share the hopes and dreams of the Pacific Islands political and business leadership, that the digital mobile broadband revolution will soon enrich the lives of the Pacific people. Connectivity will bring about political, social, educational, health care and economic reforms that were only dreamt about in recent times.

I’ve recently written of my amazement at the technical and business achievements of O3B. A satellite based fiber replacement in the sky, which has either delayed or negated the need for Pacific Island nations to use their sovereign wealth funds to invest in expensive under sea fiber cables. This MEO system has its place, its pros and its cons. However another transformative technology is on the near horizon for the Pacific, one that will help bridge the digital divide.

Like the long overdue, High Throughput (HTS) Ka Band satellites now being constructed and soon to be launch by Australia’s National Broadband Network Co. a new provider will soon be over head providing the same NBN like speeds and service to the Pacific. Kacific will bring the next wave of affordable broadband to homes, villages and businesses throughout the Pacific Islands. In addition large parts of under served regional and remote parts of Asia, like Indonesia’s far flung Islands, which are not so different from the South Pacific Islands, these will also benefit from Kacific’s new satellite. Not to mention parts of NZ which will also soon have an ultra fast and affordable Ka Band HTS satellite service via Kacific.

With powerful and focused Ka Band spot beams across the vast distance of the Pacific Ocean, Kacific will deliver broadband speeds at never before seen pricing, in places you would never have suspected and all by using quite inexpensive end user terminal equipment. The company’s web site says that the potential market for their new satellite is in excess of 40 million people. A market they’ll clearly lead and dominate in the very near future given their innovative approach to the problem and regional uniqueness.

It’s worth taking a look at their web site; http://kacific.com/.

Just look at the success of companies like Digicell who are investing in the Pacific’s digital future and reaping the financial rewards for doing so. When Kacific eventually lists I’d say take a punt, this is something that will not only make business sense for your investment portfolio, but you’ll be helping the people of the Pacific Islands into a new digital future of health, economic freedom, global participation and happiness.