Papua New Guinea – A market to be exploited 

By: Jonny Andrews

The rich market of Papua New Guinea is open to exploitation by those who have the money!

Usually, these are foreign corporates that rides on our country’s weakness in protecting its people and even with the ignorance of most of our landowners.

The case of CRAM trying to take control of HPL even with only 15% shareholding is very interesting. Why is HPL an attractive company to control an owned?

Highlands Pacific Limited has been exploring minerals and gas in Papua New Guinea since the early 1960’s. They have once of the most comprehensive database of all mineral deposits in the country.

Get your hands on those database….you on your way to making millions and expoilting Papua New Guinea


Tussle over HPL’s future control

February 27,2017, 01:40 am

A RIFT has developed between Highlands Pacific Limited (HPL) and its shareholder, Chinese group Guangdong Rising Assets Management Co Ltd (GRAM), over the future control of the Papua New Guinea company.

HPL says it is a battle with potentially major ramifications for its multi-billion kina PNG projects, including Frieda River, Ramu Nickel and Star Mountains.

Last week, GRAM subsidiary PanAust, which owns a 14 percent stake in HPL, had demanded a meeting of HPL’s shareholders to remove four of the company’s five non-executive independent directors and replace them with three GRAM nominees.

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HPL argued the highly aggressive move would deliver GRAM control of the firm which was valued at about A$60 million (K146 million), without GRAM having paid anything to the other shareholders of the company that collectively hold 86 percent.

The move also would deliver GRAM essentially full, unassailable control of the giant US$6 billion (K19bn) Frieda River project in West Sepik Province. HPL and GRAM are joint venture partners in the project, with GRAM holding an 80 percent interest and HPL 20 percent.

HPL also holds an 8.56 percent interest in the Ramu Nickel project, as well as a major shareholding in the exciting Star Mountains exploration project.

HPL directors had opposed GRAM demands, stating that handing control of the Company to GRAM/PanAust would not be in the interests of its shareholders.

Chairman Ken MacDonald said the GRAM/PanAust proposal effectively amounted to a takeover of Highlands without offering to pay shareholders.

HPL managing director Craig Lennon said the future of Highlands was vitally important for the development of its projects, and could have serious economic implications for PNG.

“We want to see these projects, especially the Frieda River project, develop in a timely fashion, creating potentially enormous economic benefits for PNG by creating jobs, generating revenues for government and earning foreign exchange income,” he said.

“With Highlands remaining as an independent company, we have the best chance of achieving that outcome.”

The special meeting to consider the matter would be held in Port Moresby, and shareholders would vote on the proposals to remove four of the five non-executive independent directors including the chairman.

The two directors who GRAM is not trying to remove for now are the managing director Craig Lennon and Bart Philemon, the highly respected former treasury minister.

http://www.postcourier.com.pg/Stories/tussle-over-hpls-future-control/#.WLOLVxJ97Vp 

 

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Trukai expanding investment in local rice production

By: Jonny Andrews

Competition is by far the greatest phenomenon that has happened to mankind!

Decades and decades of Rice Monopoly is about to go up in smoke when the Government puts in-place plans for Naima to grow rice in Papua New Guinea. What does Trukai do in this instance? Do they fight the Government? Do they cry wolf? They do what is the most logical thing to do and what the Government hoped they do.

Trukai now has expand their plans! They go into a 500-hectare rice plantation and want to invest more locally!

This the beauty of competition…..at the end of the day, you see investment coming into Agriculture sector and into Papua New Guinea. We need more local invest, more local employment and more of food security.

Well done Trukai!

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BY: Loop Business —14:07, February 22, 2017

This week Trukai Industries Limited is purchasing agricultural equipment for the establishment of the largest rice crop in PNG’s recent history.

 

With the cooperation of the Chingwam Rice Growers Cooperative, Trukai will be establishing a 500-hectare rice plantation near Rangiampum initially for a rain fed crop to be established in 2017.

This is in addition to the existing 80-hectare site already producing rice for the cooperative, under the management of Trukai’s rice development team.

This site will be progressively expanded possibly up to 1,500-2,000 hectares over a number of seasons, although this will be subject to relevant agreements and climatic and soil evaluations.

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Trukai Rice Field in Markham

This exciting step forward in domestic rice production comes ahead of further developments Trukai management are hoping to discuss with government, following submissions for large scale irrigated rice growing in a number of areas across PNG.

Proposals have been submitted to the Departments of Agriculture and Livestock, and the Department of Trade, Commerce and Investment, although responses from government have yet to be forthcoming.

Trukai Industries Limited’s CEO, Greg Worthington-Eyre said in a statement, “Trukai stands ready to assist the government of PNG in its domestic rice development, and this project with the Chingwam Cooperative is a major step forward in laying the groundwork for other projects.

Whilst we wait for the government to respond to our proposals, we are simply getting on with it, and are very excited about building a strong local rice industry.”

Worthington-Eyre went on to add, “The establishment of the large scale site at Rangiampum will be supplemented with a further 100-hectare site closer to our Erap facility, where our rice seed generation plantation is being redeveloped.”

In April and May this year, Trukai will be installing a hulling mill in Lae to facilitate the processing of locally grown rice, and this represents a significant investment and commitment for Trukai.

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Workers checking the quality of rice

The first rice to be processed at this mill will be the rice from the Chingwam Cooperative.

Worthington-Eyre concluded, “The rice growing at Rangiampum is expected to be harvested in April this year, and will be transported to Lae for milling and blending.

“Our rice, PNG’s favourite brand since 1970 (before federation) will contain rice grown in PNG.

“This is great news as not only will we be including locally grown rice in our products, food security gets a major boost as well and, more importantly, this puts money into the rural sector for use of land that would normally remain idle.”

http://www.looppng.com/business/trukai-expanding-investment-local-rice-production-52957

Should Papua New Guinea consider pumped storage hydropower for its power outages

by: Jonny Andrew

The continuous power outages in and around Papua New Guinea and most especially in Port Moresby and Lae calls for an out-of-the-box approach in power generation. The concept of Pumped storage hydropower in Australia should serve as a lesson worth considering.

Pumped hydroelectric storage facilities store energy in the form of water in an upper reservoir, pumped from another reservoir at a lower elevation. During periods of high electricity demand, power is generated by releasing the stored water through turbines in the same manner as a conventional hydropower station. During periods of low demand (usually nights or weekends when electricity is also lower cost), the upper reservoir is recharged by using lower-cost electricity from the grid to pump the water back to the upper reservoir.

Reversible pump-turbine/motor-generator assemblies can act as both pumps and turbines. Pumped storage stations are unlike traditional hydroelectric stations in that they are a net consumer of electricity, due to hydraulic and electrical losses incurred in the cycle of pumping from lower to upper reservoirs. However, these plants are typically highly efficient (round-trip efficiencies reaching greater than 80%) and can prove very beneficial in terms of balancing load within the overall power system. Pumped-storage facilities can be very economical due to peak tand off-peak price differentials and their potential to provide critical ancillary grid services.

Papua New Guinea should seriously consider Pumped Storage Hydropower to sustain and supplement the current hydro power stations

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Author – Nick West 
22nd February 2017

OVERCOMING THE BARRIERS TO PUMPED STORAGE HYDROPOWER

With energy reliability a hot topic in Australia, eyes are now turning to pumped storage hydropower… but what has been holding it back?
There are only three pumped storage hydropower projects in Australia, with the most recent completed more than thirty years ago. This is despite the ability of pumped storage hydropower projects to provide the large-scale storage that would complement increasing levels of renewable energy. Why is this, and what are the barriers to developing more Australian pumped storage hydropower projects?

Around the world, pumped storage hydropower projects make up the vast majority of grid energy storage and have traditionally been used by energy utilities to supply additional power to a grid during times of highest demand.

As part of a portfolio of power stations, a utility might operate a pumped storage project infrequently only, if the cost of pumping the water back to the upper storage exceeds the revenue that can be generated from its release.

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The main issue facing developers trying to prove the viability of a new pumped storage project is that a sufficient price differential is required to pay for the pumping and to account for the efficiency losses in transmission, pumping and generation. The generation price needs to be sufficiently higher than the pumping price just to repay the variable pumping costs. To repay the heavy capital investment, a margin is required over and above the break-even cost of pumping. This is particularly true where proposed developments are ‘stand-alone’ and cannot be optimised as part of a corporate generation portfolio.

In recent years, electricity price spikes have been irregular with few occurrences each year. Due to the significant capital costs, a pumped storage scheme would require a certain number of pumping/generation cycles at high or maximum pricing to pay a return on investment. These price spikes are unpredictable, so building a business case around these events is risky.

Historically, the daily fluctuation of power prices has not been sufficient or regular enough to attract pumped storage developers. This is beginning to change with increasing penetration of renewable energy leading to an increase in both low and high price periods. More frequent, sustained periods of hot weather (as predicted by climate change models) will also drive up demand for power and therefore the market price.

In the last few months, volatility has greatly increased, creating a greater differential between baseload and peak pricing. This will increase the viability of pumped storage schemes, although the unpredictability and challenges of financing capital intensive assets will remain.

But, even when the economics are right, there are still some other barriers that proponents of pumped storage projects need to overcome:

FINDING THE RIGHT SITE

Pumped storage projects require significant capital for development. Minimising the cost of construction and operation is key to the successful development of a project. Choosing the right location is a matter of identifying a site with ideal topography, a source of water and good proximity to and location within the transmission network.

A wealth of information is available that is relevant to identifying potential pumped storage hydropower sites. Concept studies for pumped storage hydropower sites can screen potential sites quickly and offer developers greater insight into possible opportunities.

NEGOTIATING ACCESS TO APPROPRIATE SITES FOR PUMPED STORAGE

While a pumped storage project generally has a significantly smaller footprint than a traditional hydropower project, the features of natural topography that are ideal for pumped storage – high, steep hillsides or cliffs – tend also to be places of great natural beauty and are often designated as reserves, are expensive private land, or have high environmental or social value.

State governments can assist here through streamlined planning and approvals processes for infrastructure developments. This can make sure that the challenges of developing sites do not become insurmountable for developers.

PERCEIVED ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS

Pumped storage projects can occupy many square kilometres and also require transmission lines to connect to the electricity market. Like traditional hydropower projects, pumped storage projects need to attend to environmental issues associated with the project. Environmental impacts for pumped storage projects are assessed in the same manner as for all infrastructure developments.

If the impacts of a project can be mitigated to the satisfaction of the relevant regulatory body and international Standards (such as the International Hydropower Association and International Finance Corporation), a pumped storage hydropower project should face no greater hurdle than any other infrastructure project in this respect.

A pumped storage project may also have to deal with the perception that it uses carbon-intensive thermal power to pump water during the pumping cycle. This may be true unless there is a surplus of renewable energy available, in which case the pumped storage project could be seen to be using this excess renewable energy for pumping. As renewable energy penetration grows, the opportunities for storing surplus renewable energy will increase.

AN UNFAVOURABLE REGULATORY FRAMEWORK

Inconsistent and uncertain policy positions of the major political parties at both federal and state levels reduce confidence in the energy industry, which deters investment. With debate raging over energy security, a bipartisan view on energy policy, which transcends party politics and the electoral cycle, is urgently needed.

Existing mechanisms are in place to support the renewable energy industry. The Renewable Energy Target (RET) promotes investment in renewable energy projects; however, pumped storage is specifically excluded from the RET where the energy used for pumping exceeds the energy generated. Current policy would have to be amended or complementary legislation enacted in order to reward large-scale storage for the service it provides.

Such changes could include market mechanisms for large-scale storage that could offer incentives for providing inertia and ancillary services from storage at times of peak demand as well as power. Another possible change could be to ensure that large-scale storage asset owners are not penalised under the RET for energy used in the pumping process. This would encourage the development of energy storage as a complement to the growth of renewable energy.

HIGH COST OF DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES

The long lead times and high development costs of pumped storage projects are major deterrents to developers. Projects generally take more than 4 to 5 years from the point of conception to ‘power on’, and require millions of dollars of capital for development and hundreds of millions for construction. In other words, when funding is first committed, it may not see a return for five years or more. In an effort to overcome this barrier, the Clean Energy Finance Corporation (CEFC) has committed $20 million to finance the accelerated development of flexible capacity and large-scale storage projects.

With an increasing interest and emphasis on storage in a power system that is becoming increasingly unreliable (e.g. load shedding in South Australia and lack of reserve events in New South Wales), and with finance from the CEFC for large-scale storage, the barriers to pumped storage development are gradually diminishing. This action can’t come soon enough for residents suffering through blackouts on days over 40°C.

Court approves ExxonMobil buyout of InterOil’s assets in Elk-Antelope gas fields

BY: Cedric Patjole – 15:00, February 21, 2017

ExxonMobil will by the end of this week takeover InterOil after the commercial arrangement between the two companies, worth more than K6 billion, was approved yesterday.

ExxonMobil will now own InterOil’s assets in the undeveloped Elk-Antelope gas fields, in the Gulf Province, and exploration licenses covering about 16,000sqkm.

In a statement today, InterOil announced that the Supreme Court of Yukon in Canada, granted a final order approving the arrangement between InterOil and ExxonMobil.

In November 2016 the Yukon Supreme Court had initially upheld an appeal by InterOil founder, Phil Mulacek, against an original takeover offer.

Last week InterOil shareholders overwhelmingly approved a revised transaction agreement with Exxon Mobil with more than 91 per cent of  votes cast in favour.

Previously 80 per cent of shareholders voted to approve the original transaction  at a Special Meeting on September 21, 2016.

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According to the amended agreement Exxon Mobil lifted the maximum price payable for InterOil by about 10 per cent to US$78.94 (K236) per share.

The offer was structured as a US$45 (K135) per share flat cash payment, plus an extra US$7.07 (K21) per share for each trillion cubic feet (tcf) of gas certified as being held in Elk-Antelope.

Under the approved arrangement, ExxonMobil now becomes a Joint Venture in the Papua LNG Project, operated by Total SA, and the PNG Government, with expected first gas in the early 2020s.

The Papua LNG will be supported by the Elk-Antelope gas field, located in the Eastern Papuan Basin.

ExxonMobil now has a commanding position in the basin with a record of five successful discoveries originally by InterOil – Triceratops, Elk, Antelope, Raptor and Bobcat.

This afternoon, an ExxonMobil spokesperson informed Loop PNG that “the acquisition of InterOil as envisioned in the amended agreement continues to represent a significant value to the government and people of Papua New Guinea, as well as to InterOil shareholders.  ExxonMobil looks forward to closing the transaction in accordance with the Plan of Arrangement.”

Pictures credit: http://www.offshorepost.com/

Advance Australia unfair

By Emma Larking on February 10, 2017



Operation Sovereign Borders poster (Wikimedia Commons)Australia is pouring money into a system that targets the vulnerable in our region, and it is doing so with considerable secrecy and scant regard for the costs.
Recent evidence of its profligacy came in a report from the Australian National Audit Office claiming the immigration department spent $2.2 billion on offshore detention programs without going through adequate processes to ensure value for money, and without appropriate oversight of contracts for services.


The report found contracts had been entered into in haste to give effect to government policy decisions, and the result was higher than necessary expense for taxpayers and significant reputational risks for the Australian Government and the department.
Australia’s offshore detention camps are now notorious, but less is known about other attempts to curb irregular migration. Yet Australia invests heavily throughout the Asia-Pacific to ensure that irregular migrants – including asylum seekers – never arrive on its shores.
The Australian public has a right to know how the Government is spending public monies, to what ends and with what results. The public also deserves an explanation of how spending on border controls fits with other regional policy initiatives. These include justice programs designed to promote the rule of law, strengthen judicial independence, support national human rights institutions and counter violence against women and children.
In countries throughout the Asia-Pacific region, Australia provides funding and infrastructure to establish border controls, and personnel to draft new migration laws and policy frameworks. Members of the Australian Federal Police, defence force personnel and immigration department employees collaborate closely with their regional counterparts, often working in-country. The Australian Navy and Secret Intelligence Service are engaged in operations to intercept asylum seekers and stop people smuggling.
As well as the detention centres in Nauru and Papua New Guinea (PNG), Australia also funds detention centres in Indonesia. It funded the Nauruan and PNG Government’s defence in cases challenging the constitutionality of the detention centres. It also funds international agencies to process and oversee irregular migrants and refugees living in the community in Indonesia, Nauru, PNG, and until recently, Cambodia. Frequently, aid funding is linked to agreements to enhance border controls, repatriate nationals who have fled the country, or establish detention centres or refugee resettlement programs.
It is impossible to obtain clear financial costings, but a conservative accounting suggests Australia has spent well over a billion dollars annually since 2012 on these efforts to prevent irregular migration. With no boats known to have made landfall on Australian territory since late 2013, this might be considered money well spent – albeit a large pot of it. But what are the other costs associated with this secretive regime? There is the suffering of individuals trapped in countries where they are persecuted or live in limbo without rights. But there are also broader implications for Australia and the region.
In its collaborations with Cambodia, Iran, Nauru, PNG, Sri Lanka and Vietnam, Australia has aligned itself with authoritarian regimes implicated in serious human rights abuses. 

The funding it provides in exchange for support on irregular migration strengthens and entrenches these regimes. Australia is promoting the securitisation of irregular migration in the Asia-Pacific, putting it on what Josiah Heyman calls ‘a war footing’. In the process, the power of executive governments is enhanced, along with their immunity from public scrutiny and control. Throughout the region, rights activists have expressed dismay over these developments.
Australia’s refusal to open its borders to displaced people is also viewed with disdain by communities that are poorer and less well equipped to assist. Deni ToKunai, a political commentator in PNG, says the 2013 agreement to establish an Australian-funded detention centre contributed to “a boiling resentment [among many in PNG] against Australia and the Australian people never before seen by this generation”.
This resentment is unlikely to evaporate. PNG’s Supreme Court may have ruled the detention arrangements unconstitutional, but there are still hundreds of people living in the centre, and building work is underway on a new ‘transfer’ centre funded by Australia.
How Australia’s irregular migration policies interact with other forms of regional policy engagement has not been publicly explained or defended, but the former are inconsistent with other goals, including advancing the rule of law. Regional justice programs are unlikely to gain traction while Australia continues to fund detention and control regimes that perpetuate violence and operate outside the purview of the law. Instead, they may well contribute to regional perceptions of Australia as a nation of selfish and self-serving hypocrites.

http://devpolicy.org/advance-australia-unfair-20170210/?utm_source=Devpolicy&utm_campaign=07c434825b-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_082b498f84-07c434825b-312063401

HE WHO PLANTS FIRST, REAPS EARLY!

By: Andrew Arthur

The Agriculture Sector is about to get a Major Shakeup!

As the campaigning of forming the next Government heats up. Each Political party would want to be seen as the Government for the people and wants to connect to the people. Major policy pushed would be a returned to the Agriculture Sector …

First to fire their Policy is Pangu Party with a funding of K2billion promised for Agriculture! K1 billion to be spent on Coffee and Cocoa as they believe would earn more. The other K1 billion is to be spread across other agriculture sectors.

The reality is…according to FAO, coffee is listed number 22 of the most important and high earning crop and cocoa is not listed in the top 52 at all!

hydroponics-solves-food-security-issue
Hydroponic solves food security issues

Pangu would be guilty of making the same mistake they did in the early 1980’s………..

What this country needs is to invest into the right product…..look at the list attached, pick the Top 30 and invest into that according to priority.

Food Security is what is Needed the Most! Invest into Food Security as oppose to investing into Coffee and Cocoa!

1. Rice
2. Cattle Farming
3. Poultry Farming
4. Piggery
5. Tomatoes, beans, onions etc…

This is where the people in Papua New Guinea want us to invest in….this is what put food on the table

Invest in Food Security!

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Pangu Pati will invest into AGRICULTURE when in Government.

Today PNG’s Economy depends on 80% Non-renewal resources & 20% Agriculture export earnings, it was the other way around when we took independence in 1975.

Pangu Pati plans to invest at least K2b into agriculture with a billion directory into Coffee & Cocoa expansion and extension programs.

Coffee to become MINISTRY of COFFEE while cocoa to be the same as both are currently earning K500m into our economy from export earnings.

The investment into the two leading cash crops will see a 15 to 20 years timeline to increase production to earn over K2b plus into our economy.

Expansion and extension programs will see an annual investment K200m each into coffee and cocoa programs.

Agricuiture Ministry will be the leading ministry once again under Pangu Pati with coffee and cocoa to independently branch out into ministries of their own.

The rural population and business groups will participate more into agricuiture to feed PNG the world.
Agricuiture is sustainable and safe investment that PNG must quickly invest into to reduce our reliance on non-renewals.
The National Pg 7 07/02/17

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Most valuable crops and livestock according to FAO
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Pangu wants to invest in Coffee and Cocoa with K1 billion

ADB Helps PNG Expand Port Moresby International Airport Using PPP

By: The FINANCIAL

The Asian Development Bank (ADB) and the Papua New Guinea (PNG) National Airports Corporation (NAC) signed a transaction advisory services agreement to develop a new international passenger terminal at Port Moresby (Jacksons) International Airport through public-private partnership (PPP) on 2 February 2017.
“ADB has been a key development partner to NAC for several years through the landmark Civil Aviation Development Investment Program,” said Marcelo Minc, Country Director of ADB’s PNG Resident Mission. “Through this transaction advisory support to NAC for the Jacksons airport, we hope to complement the work we are doing across the PNG aviation sector, develop a regional hub for air traffic in the Pacific, and create a template for delivery of PPP projects in the region.”

The project will use a PPP scheme where the private sector will design, build, finance, operate, and maintain the airport facilities. A new international passenger terminal, the extension of the main runway, and other infrastructure enhancements will help the airport meet forecast air services growth up to 2040. The concession period and other parameters will be determined based on the feasibility study, according to ADB.
ADB’s support is part of its ongoing assistance to PNG to identify and develop PPPs in the transport sector, a key priority in ADB’s 2016-2020 Country Partnership Strategy for PNG. ADB has been supporting the government to improve 21 national airports to provide safer, more secure, and all-weather air transport services through the Civil Aviation Development Investment Program. Jacksons International Airport is part of the program.

The project will be ADB’s first PPP transaction advisory engagement in PNG and the Pacific. As part of the agreement, ADB also aims to create document and contact templates that may be used for future PPPs in the region and to build local expertise in PPP management and execution.
http://www.finchannel.com/business/63208-adb-helps-png-expand-port-moresby-international-airport-using-ppp

The 6 largest building projects set to change Port Moresby

This year’s business forecasts in PNG are looking more modest than previous years, but there’s no doubting better things are on the horizon for Port Moresby in 2017. The city’s skyline is set to change over the next eighteen months with the addition of new commercial, residential, hotel and retail buildings planned across the region.

With a range of projects in various stages of development, it’s a race against time to complete them before the APEC 2018 Summit. Even with project management, design and investment expertise from around the globe, the clock is ticking on the completion of Port Moresby’s newest buildings. Here’s Peopleconnexion Recruitment’s visual guide to the city’s latest projects.

1. Star Mountain Plaza

It seems fitting to start with talking about Star Mountain Plaza. Set to provide hotel, office and residential spaces ahead of the APEC 2018 Summit, Star Mountain Plaza is PNG’s first integrated commercial development. The K1.5b project is due for completion in August next year, under the project management of Stratum. Check out the first 30 seconds of this video to get a sense of just how huge this project is.

 

Architect’s aerial view mockup (source)

Attached Hilton development (source)

2. OPH Tower – Stage Two

Stage Two of the redevelopment of Old Parliament House in the city’s centre is officially underway. This stage will feature twin residential towers and penthouse apartments leased to corporate clients, paired with retail space. Official construction works began early last year and are set to be completed in late 2018.

OPH Commercial Tower (source)

OPH Two render (source)

OPH Two render (source)

3. Rangeview Heights

The commercial and residential estates in to be located in Waigiani’s City Centre are currently being developed by Lamana under their subsidiary Rangeview Heights Limited, of which Managing Director Sir Kostas Constantinou holds a directorship. The development includes residential townhouses, an attached shopping mall within the community, secure parking, a park and green areas for residents’ use.

Rangeview Heights mall (source)

Aerial view (source)

4. Paga Hill Estate

Paga Hill is set to be the city’s first multi-use development including luxury hotels, over 800 residential apartments, commercial and retail spaces, a marina and cultural centre. The project has been in proposal, planning and design development stages for years, but is finally ready to begin enter its investment and implementation stages after receiving the green light from the Government earlier this year. Estimates currently put the construction of attached Paga Hill City at around K3 billion.

Aerial view (source)

Artist’s rendering (source)

5. APEC Haus

The next iconic PNG landmark is expected to start construction early this year. To complete this K120 million project, Ela Beach will be extended out by 100 metres to support the structure, which will be built over the water. From the air, the building’s shape will resemble a traditional Moutan lakatoi sail.

“When you see it from the air, or when you see it from the land or when you see it from a post card or on TV, or on the internet or Facebook, you will symbolise and recognise it as Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea,” – Justin Tkatchenko, Minister for Sports and APEC

The construction of the building will be part of a larger Ela Beach redevelopment project involving a four lane highway to join the Paga Ring Road.

Artist’s render (source)

 

6. Loloata Island

Loloata Island Resort is still very much a work in progress. After being sold late last year, the former dive resort is set to be redeveloped into a luxury hotel with suites and private villas. Though technically not located in Port Moresby, this project’s massive undertaking makes it a development worth mentioning.

Aerial view (source)

Depictions by architects ThomsonAdsett: